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GeneSeek to Handle Genotyping in 'Supershedder' E. coli Study

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Food and animal safety testing company Neogen said today that its GeneSeek subsidiary will provide genotyping services for a research project conducted by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, which is being funded by the US Department of Agriculture.

Lincoln, Neb.-based GeneSeek, which Neogen bought last year for $13.8 million, will deliver its genotyping services as part of an effort to discover how genetic variation in cattle affects E. coli transmission and contaminations.

The partnership with USDA's Meat Animal Research Center is aimed at discovering genetic markers to identify which cows shed more of the harmful E. coli O157:H7 strain than others.

"Researchers believe that if genetic markers for 'supershedders' of E. coli O157:H7, or animals that do not carry the microorganism, can be established, genetic and breeding programs can be developed to help minimize the risk that the pathogen presents to consumers of beef products," Neogen Chairman and CEO James Herbert said in a statement.

Financial terms of the agreement were not released.

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