Faster Flu Vaccines?

Synthetic Genomics is working on speeding up flu vaccine production, according to the San Diego Union-Tribune.

First Stages

Early trial of experimental gene-based Zika vaccine indicates it is tolerated and leads to an antibody response.

The Universal Influenza Vaccine Initiative, led by Vanderbilt and the Human Vaccines Project, has turned to omics and AI to create more effective flu vaccines.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: grape genomes give insight into domestication, columnar cacti classification, and more.

Not Cow, But Horse

The sequencing of a more than 100-year-old smallpox vaccine finds that it contains horsepox, researchers write in NEJM.

Neon Therapeutics is sponsoring a Phase Ib trial of neoantigen-based vaccines in combination with anti-PD-1 treatment in melanoma, lung cancer, and bladder cancer.

The two companies plan to combine their respective gene editing and neoantigen discover technologies in order to develop new T cell therapies for cancer patients.

Two independent research teams published findings for melanoma patients treated with vaccines developed against neo-antigens in their tumors that sequencing uncovered.

The New Vaccines

Hopkins' Geoffrey Ling discusses the promise of genomic vaccines at Scientific American.

The project aims to sequence the immune repertoires of study participants to spur new vaccine and immunotherapy development. 


An opinion piece in the Guardian argues that President Donald Trump is uninterested in science and that might not be a bad thing for the field.

The San Francisco Chronicle reports the Veterans Affairs Health System is studying whether genetic testing can help prescribe better depression therapies.

Stat News reports that Spark Therapeutics' Luxturna is now being used to treat a wider array of patients.

In Genome Biology this week: transcription factor use among brittle stars, single-cell RNA sequencing strategy, and more.