vaccines

Neon Therapeutics is sponsoring a Phase Ib trial of neoantigen-based vaccines in combination with anti-PD-1 treatment in melanoma, lung cancer, and bladder cancer.

The two companies plan to combine their respective gene editing and neoantigen discover technologies in order to develop new T cell therapies for cancer patients.

Two independent research teams published findings for melanoma patients treated with vaccines developed against neo-antigens in their tumors that sequencing uncovered.

The New Vaccines

Hopkins' Geoffrey Ling discusses the promise of genomic vaccines at Scientific American.

The project aims to sequence the immune repertoires of study participants to spur new vaccine and immunotherapy development. 

Make Your Own Vaccine

There are a number of efforts underway to develop DNA vaccines for diseases like Zika, according to the Wall Street Journal.

The two partners hope to start a Phase I combination trial pairing Genentech's anti-PDL1 cancer immunotherapy Tecentriq with vaccines developed using BioNTech's IVAC Mutanome. 

US Army scientists have developed a way to more precisely determine the amount of antigen needed as they develop an Ebola virus-like particle vaccine.

Elaine Mardis of Washington University in St. Louis described genome-guided efforts to identify neoantigen targets for cancer vaccines in melanoma and other cancer types.

The program will use transcriptomics, proteomics, lipidomics, and metabolomics to explore immune response.

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The president of France's National Research Agency has resigned, according to Nature News.

A senator wants a "right-to-try" provision in the US Food and Drug Administration funding bill, but an ethicist says at Stat News that it would undermine the role of clinical trials.

In PNAS this week: red algae Porphyra umbicalis genome, deep neural network model for sequencing peptides, and more.

The Guardian's Barbara Ellen has tried out some DNA testing services to see whether they provide valuable information.