vaccines

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: grape genomes give insight into domestication, columnar cacti classification, and more.

Not Cow, But Horse

The sequencing of a more than 100-year-old smallpox vaccine finds that it contains horsepox, researchers write in NEJM.

Neon Therapeutics is sponsoring a Phase Ib trial of neoantigen-based vaccines in combination with anti-PD-1 treatment in melanoma, lung cancer, and bladder cancer.

The two companies plan to combine their respective gene editing and neoantigen discover technologies in order to develop new T cell therapies for cancer patients.

Two independent research teams published findings for melanoma patients treated with vaccines developed against neo-antigens in their tumors that sequencing uncovered.

The New Vaccines

Hopkins' Geoffrey Ling discusses the promise of genomic vaccines at Scientific American.

The project aims to sequence the immune repertoires of study participants to spur new vaccine and immunotherapy development. 

Make Your Own Vaccine

There are a number of efforts underway to develop DNA vaccines for diseases like Zika, according to the Wall Street Journal.

The two partners hope to start a Phase I combination trial pairing Genentech's anti-PDL1 cancer immunotherapy Tecentriq with vaccines developed using BioNTech's IVAC Mutanome. 

US Army scientists have developed a way to more precisely determine the amount of antigen needed as they develop an Ebola virus-like particle vaccine.

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The US Food and Drug Administration has new guidelines that enable some gene and cell therapies to undergo expedited review, according to the New York Times.

Using gene drives to control invasive species might be too risky, an initial advocate of the approach says.

Researchers have grown tumors in 3D cell cultures to better understand cancer, the Economist reports.

In Science this week: intellectual property experts argue patent battles such as the one over CRISPR are wasteful, and more.