Top500

Australia's Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative hosts the fastest life science supercomputer in the world, according to the most recent version of the Top500 list released earlier this month.

Supercomputers at Janelia Farm and the University of Tokyo's Laboratory for Systems Biology and Medicine did not meet the 40.1-teraflop benchmark for inclusion in the 37th edition of the twice-yearly ranking.

Three life science computers — at MD Anderson Cancer Center, the Genome Science Center at the University of British Columbia, and the Laboratory for Systems Biology and Medicine at the University of Tokyo — beat the 31.1-teraflop benchmark for inclusion in the latest edition of the twice-yearly list.

The 97.1-teraflop, 18,176-core "Chinook" HP cluster at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory remains the top life science machine on the twice-yearly ranking of the world's fastest supercomputers.

A 5,760-core Sun Microsystems blade system at the University of Tokyo's Human Genome Center is the second-fastest life science computer on the latest Top500 list. It follows the 97.1-teraflop, 18,176-core "Chinook" HP cluster at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, which holds the No. 34 spot in the current list.

Rare gene mutations are guiding the search for drugs to manage chronic pain without opioids, according to CNBC.

The new Francis Crick Institute building can get too noisy for some researchers to concentrate, according to the Guardian.

CBS News reports that there are still many vacancies at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, but that it's uncertain whether they will be filled.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: pipeline to analyze and visualize bacterial genomes, database of global set of human genomes, and more.