Top500

Australia's Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative hosts the fastest life science supercomputer in the world, according to the most recent version of the Top500 list released earlier this month.

Supercomputers at Janelia Farm and the University of Tokyo's Laboratory for Systems Biology and Medicine did not meet the 40.1-teraflop benchmark for inclusion in the 37th edition of the twice-yearly ranking.

Three life science computers — at MD Anderson Cancer Center, the Genome Science Center at the University of British Columbia, and the Laboratory for Systems Biology and Medicine at the University of Tokyo — beat the 31.1-teraflop benchmark for inclusion in the latest edition of the twice-yearly list.

The 97.1-teraflop, 18,176-core "Chinook" HP cluster at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory remains the top life science machine on the twice-yearly ranking of the world's fastest supercomputers.

A 5,760-core Sun Microsystems blade system at the University of Tokyo's Human Genome Center is the second-fastest life science computer on the latest Top500 list. It follows the 97.1-teraflop, 18,176-core "Chinook" HP cluster at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, which holds the No. 34 spot in the current list.

The Associated Press reports that the US government wasted $341,000 on travel by former Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price.

Women who post YouTube science videos get more critical comments and more comments about their appearance than male video hosts, the New York Times reports.

The Wall Street Journal writes that participating in genetic research brings up the specter of past research ethics lapses for some African Americans.

In PLOS this week: sequences influencing yeast prion aggregation or degradation, dengue virus genetic variants affect transmission dynamics, and more.