Top500

Australia's Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative hosts the fastest life science supercomputer in the world, according to the most recent version of the Top500 list released earlier this month.

Supercomputers at Janelia Farm and the University of Tokyo's Laboratory for Systems Biology and Medicine did not meet the 40.1-teraflop benchmark for inclusion in the 37th edition of the twice-yearly ranking.

Three life science computers — at MD Anderson Cancer Center, the Genome Science Center at the University of British Columbia, and the Laboratory for Systems Biology and Medicine at the University of Tokyo — beat the 31.1-teraflop benchmark for inclusion in the latest edition of the twice-yearly list.

The 97.1-teraflop, 18,176-core "Chinook" HP cluster at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory remains the top life science machine on the twice-yearly ranking of the world's fastest supercomputers.

A 5,760-core Sun Microsystems blade system at the University of Tokyo's Human Genome Center is the second-fastest life science computer on the latest Top500 list. It follows the 97.1-teraflop, 18,176-core "Chinook" HP cluster at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, which holds the No. 34 spot in the current list.

Researchers have found that the i-motif shape of DNA previously observed in the lab also exists in human cells, and that it may serve a purpose.

In PNAS this week: a genomic, transcriptomic, and metabolomic analysis of the tea plant, Arabidopsis thaliana's adaptations to specific local environments, and more.

In an against-all-odds twist, a researcher studying exceeding rare FOXG1 mutations discovers her daughter has the syndrome.

An effort by Genomics Medicine Ireland is creating a database of diseases based on the genomics of people in Ireland. It now is looking into the possibility of including Scotland in its work.