single-molecule barcoding

In 2015, the iBOL project met its initial milestone of generating barcode sequences for 500,000 animal, plant, and fungal species.

The researchers have filed a patent on their method, SiMSen-seq, and are continuing to develop it, as well as a software tool, for oncology applications. 

The QIAseq panels, which are available now, are the first of three major product launches Qiagen has planned for the second half of the year.

In early experiments, the method's raw single pass error rate was approximately 2 percent for a single target and up to 4 percent for a mixture of 10 targets. 

The firm is nearing a market launch of the system, called the nanoAnalyzer 1000. The system is being developed for a variety of applications including genome assembly, structural variation analysis, and assessing DNA damage.

A Danish and Swedish-led research team reports that it has used a combination of nanochannels and denaturation to map so-called "barcode" patterns for labeled DNA.

Using DNA to sketch crime victims might not be a great idea, the NYTimes says.

Science has its own problem with sexual harassment. What do we do with the research these abusers produce, Wired asks.

Senate Republicans led by Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) are trying to change how the government funds basic research, reports ScienceInsider.

In Science this week: combining genomics and ecology to better understand the effects of natural selection on evolution, and more.