single-molecule barcoding

The amplicon sequencing method, called resistance mutation sequencing (RM-seq), may help in detecting resistance earlier than traditional techniques.

The startup's first product will focus on 16S and 18S rRNA sequencing, and it plans to launch kits for shotgun metagenomics, HLA sequencing and phasing, and more.

In 2015, the iBOL project met its initial milestone of generating barcode sequences for 500,000 animal, plant, and fungal species.

The researchers have filed a patent on their method, SiMSen-seq, and are continuing to develop it, as well as a software tool, for oncology applications. 

The QIAseq panels, which are available now, are the first of three major product launches Qiagen has planned for the second half of the year.

In early experiments, the method's raw single pass error rate was approximately 2 percent for a single target and up to 4 percent for a mixture of 10 targets. 

The firm is nearing a market launch of the system, called the nanoAnalyzer 1000. The system is being developed for a variety of applications including genome assembly, structural variation analysis, and assessing DNA damage.

A Danish and Swedish-led research team reports that it has used a combination of nanochannels and denaturation to map so-called "barcode" patterns for labeled DNA.

Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) has released the results of a genetic ancestry analysis, the Boston Globe reports.

Retraction Watch's Ivan Oransky and Adam Marcus report that Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital have recommended that more than 30 papers from a former researcher be retracted.

Thomas Steitz, who won the 2009 chemistry Nobel Prize for his ribosome work, has died, the Washington Post reports.

In PLOS this week: mechanisms for genes implicated in coronary artery disease, rumen microbes and host genetics influence cow methane production, and more.