single-cell gene expression analysis

Researchers from Belgium analyzed the transcriptomes of almost 100,000 single cells from lung cancer patients, most of them stromal cells.

Two new studies have uncovered expression-defined T cell subsets that seem to coincide with better or worse outcomes in breast cancer or non-small cell lung cancer.

The BigSCale tool incorporates a numerical model that integrates data processing, clustering, convoluting, and differential expression analysis.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: single-cell sequencing to study zebrafish and frog embryonic development.

Three new studies have used single-cell RNA sequencing methods to follow cell type trajectories over the course of zebrafish and Western claw-toed frog development.

The single approach could be useful in some of the same areas where combinations of technologies have been implemented, such as AR-V7 testing in prostate cancer.

Scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed a new package called Scanpy that they hope will support major analytical efforts, such as the Human Cell Atlas.

Researchers are working with the Australian Ministry of Health to commercialize a diagnostic test that employs the biomarker and could be available within two to five years.

Specialized single-cell "cores" are popping up to help scientists get the most out of new technologies.

A comparison of unstimulated and stimulated CD4+ T cells from young and old mice in two subspecies showed rising cell-to-cell expression variability with age.

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The US National Science Foundation's new sexual harassment policy is to go into effect next month, according to Nature News.

Researchers report using genotyping to tie together illegal ivory shipments and trace them back to a handful of cartels, the New York Times reports.

Researchers find that historical factors influence which genes are the most highly studied, the Atlantic reports.

In Nature this week: genomic ancestry analysis of Sardinians, current noncoding mutations in colorectal cancer, and more.