recombinase polymerase amplification | GenomeWeb

recombinase polymerase amplification

The system uses off-the-shelf laboratory components and currently runs an Ebola assay based on isothermal amplification chemistry from Alere subsidiary TwistDx.

The platform — called NINA for non-instrumented nucleic acid amplification — is designed to work with a wide range of isothermal amplification methods.

A team from Estonia's University of Tartu and molecular diagnostics startup Selfdiagnostics has published a peer-reviewed study describing and clinically validating a recently developed point-of-care molecular assay to diagnose chlamydia infections.

Scientists from Seattle's PATH institute, the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and Alere subsidiary TwistDx have published a paper demonstrating the rapid detection of HIV-1 proviral DNA using assays based on TwistDx's recombinase polymerase amplification, an isothermal am

This article has been updated from a previous version to correct the names of an individual and research institution.

Health management services and diagnostics firm Alere recently updated investors on the progress of a pair of nucleic acid testing platforms that are currently under development at the company and represent the firm's entrée into molecular diagnostics.

Health management-services and diagnostics firm Alere is developing a pair of nucleic acid testing platforms, representing the company's first major move into the molecular diagnostics space, according to recent company presentations.

This article has been corrected from a previous version that stated that Axxin disclosed in January that it is developing the NAT analyzer and iNAT platforms. In fact, Alere disclosed that it is developing these platforms.

Medical Diagnostic Lab has been awarded US Patent No. 8,030,032, "Methods and compositions related thereto for detecting and identifying distinct species of nucleic acids from causative agents."

The Wall Street Journal reports that National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins' response to contamination concerns at the agency might have delayed care.

The final revision of the Common Rule doesn't include the proposed change requiring consent for leftover biospecimens.

The first Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology papers show mixed results.

In Nature this week: mobile phone-based targeted DNA sequencing, and more.