prognostic signature | GenomeWeb

prognostic signature

An international team of researchers examined differential gene expression in blood samples from patients infected during the West African outbreak.

A team led by University of Toronto researchers developed the signature as a clinical assay that could predict treatment response.

Researchers uncovered snoRNA differences in tumors from breast cancer cases with better or worse overall survival or recurrence-free survival.

Researchers saw abbreviated overall survival times in estrogen receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer patients with ESR1 mutations in their cell-free DNA.

An algorithm called SURVIV tapped TCGA RNA sequence data to find exon-skipping events associated with better or worse outcomes in breast and other cancers.

Researchers used the 21-gene expression assay to find individuals at lowest risk of breast cancer recurrence, who were spared adjuvant chemotherapy.

The company's EndoPredict test, launched in 2011, uses cancer gene expression profiling in combination with standard prognostic factors to assess relapse risk in breast cancer patients.

Though cancer experts noted many tests under MEDCAC review were developed to be predictive of treatment response, CMS maintained the meeting's focus on the prognostic context.

A team scrutinized use of the 21-gene recurrence assay with the help of data on more than 70,800 individuals diagnosed with breast cancer between 2005 and 2009.

The study demonstrated that the company's DecisionDx-Melanoma assay better predicts the risk of metastasis in patients with localized disease than clinical staging alone.

Pages

In PLOS this week: a sequencing-based screen of Lyme disease-causing pathogen, the range of animals bitten by Anopheles darling mosquitoes in Peru, and more.

An NC State researcher is exploring the use of CRISPR-Cas3 as an anti-microbial, Gizmodo reports.

The Earth BioGenome Project plans to sequence all life on Earth, according to ScienceInsider.

For those who are concerned about Trump administration actions related to science, a new column in Scientific American has suggestions for ways to fight back.