phylogenetic analysis

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: Madariaga virus linked to pediatric acute febrile illness cases in Haiti, tool to screen for viral infection in human cell lines, and more.

Something Different

A phylogenetic analysis finds that the rare hemimastigotes form their own supra-kingdom, CBC reports.

The genomic analysis also found that drug resistance mutations have appeared locally, suggesting that the issue can still be addressed region by region.

In Genome Research this week: novel nematode gene families, approach to characterize nuclear bodies and other large ribonucleoprotein complexes, and more.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: influence of DNA architecture on genome editing, within-host HIV evolution, and more.

A phylogenetic analysis that included multiple samples per patient suggests overlapping driver mutations make their way into multiple metastases in each patient.

The researchers also reported that cholera strains infecting members of the same household were highly similar, suggesting in-household transmissions.

From infant skeletal remains going back hundreds of years, a team produced three Treponema pallidum genomes, representing both syphilis- and yaws-causing sub-species.

An analysis of 3,800-year-old Yersinia pestis isolates pushed the advent of flea-based plague transmission back to around 4,000 years ago, earlier than once proposed.

Researchers sequenced 61 Zika virus genomes isolated from patients in the region to reconstruct viral movements.

Pages

An artificial intelligence-based analysis suggests a third group of ancient hominins likely interbred with human ancestors, according to Popular Mechanics.

In Science this week: reduction in bee phylogenetic diversity, and more.

The New York Times Magazine looks into paleogenomics and how it is revising what's know about human history, but also possibly ignoring lessons learned by archaeologists.

The Economist reports on Synthorx's efforts to use expanded DNA bases they generated to develop a new cancer drug.