phylogenetic analysis

Sequencing has helped clarify the baleen whale family tree, though the researchers tell the New York Times it's more of a phylogenetic network.

Two studies have found that analyzing the timing of horizontal gene transfer events can help date microbial phylogenies.

Using haplotype profiling, phylogenetics, and other analyses, researchers retraced sickle allele emergence to a single event occurring roughly 7,300 years ago.

Researchers report on a genetic analysis of ravens that indicates a species reversal event took place, according to the Guardian.

With new sequences from ancient Botai and Eurasian horses, researchers pinned early domestication to an area north of Kazakhstan. 

An international team analyzed almost 6,500 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from around the world to find new and known resistance mutations.

While the virus they found appears old, the researchers found it to be closely related to modern ones, indicating that it has infected people for centuries.

By sequencing Vibrio cholerae isolates from Africa and Latin America, investigators got a look at the lineages leading to outbreaks over several decades.

With hundreds of bacterial genome sequences, researchers characterized horizontal gene transfer hotspots contributing to genome evolution and diversification.

Researchers sequenced and analyzed the genome of Apostasia shenzhenica, which is part of a small sister lineage to other plants in the Orchidaceae family, uncovering new evolutionary clues.

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Researchers have treated an X-linked genetic disease affecting three babies in utero, Stat News reports.

The Associated Press reports that the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is beefing up sequencing as a tool to investigate foodborne illnesses.

Researchers have sequenced samples from ancient toilets to study past eating habits and health, NPR reports.

In Nature this week: ash dieback disease fungal genome, and more.