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PCR-based diagnostics

In a study published last month, Mammoth demonstrated the technology's sensitivity, specificity, and speed compared to PCR-based COVID-19 testing.

Children's Hospital Los Angeles used a SARS-CoV-2 sequencing panel to determine if patients had become infected from the same source as healthcare workers.

Fulgent saw a 75 percent increase year over year in billable tests, leading to revenues of $7.8 million. It also withdrew its 2020 full-year revenue guidance.

The funding, provided by the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, will help test and study the Bay Area population in general as well as healthcare workers in particular.

The researchers said their assay can be run in 30 to 45 minutes, with 95 percent positive predictive agreement and 100 percent negative predictive agreement.

The company, known for clinical chemistry and molecular biology diagnostic kits, is currently working on two test kits for SARS-CoV-2.

The company said its Liberty16 device is capable of detecting viral infection quickly, and can be deployed where other PCR instruments are too big to go.

The company said it expects to launch the Verigene II system with respiratory and gastrointestinal assays in the middle of this year.

The Shenzhen Mammoth Public Welfare Foundation, which BGI sponsors, has also raised funding to purchase PCR and automate sample preparation instruments.

Startup BioLizard will develop the algorithm to help Novigenix migrate its immuno-transcriptiomic assay for early colorectal cancer detection to a new NGS-based platform.

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New analyses indicate female researchers are publishing less during the coronavirus pandemic than male researchers, according to Nature News.

A study suggests people with the ApoE e4 genotype may be more likely to have severe COVID-19 than those with other genotypes, the Guardian says.

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies are searching for a genetic reason for why some people, but not others, become gravely ill with COVID-19, the Detroit Free Press reports.

In PNAS this week: forward genetics-base analysis of retinal development, interactions of T cell receptors with neoantigens in colorectal cancer, and more.