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Next-Generation Sequencing

The latest news on next-generation sequencing.

A new sequencing-based method developed by Duke University's Kate Meyer is one of several that can detect RNA methylation without the use of antibodies.

The company launched a "core" service using Illumina microarray genotyping, and has plans for an expanded NGS offering with Quest Diagnostics.

Last week's SynBioBeta conference was indicative of the high degree of interest in the synthetic bio space from omics research tool vendors.

Qiagen will have an undisclosed number of layoffs as a result of the halted GeneReader development, though it plans to create new jobs elsewhere.

Qiagen will develop IVDs for use on Illumina's clinical sequencers and reported preliminary Q3 revenue growth of 3 percent at a constant exchange rate.

The firm hopes to return fewer VUS in its test reports and to accelerate the resolution of uncertain results issued to patients in that past.

The firm will validate a model system for test development, integrate key test components, and compare Spotlight to other NIPT assays.

The researchers said the test performed well in distinguishing patients with or without complications and proved itself better than frequently used clinical variables.

The partners will codevelop software for both small and large variant detection and Illumina will create hardware-accelerated versions for its Dragen platform.

The firm disclosed to the state of California that it plans to lay off 42 employees in San Diego and 16 employees in Foster City.

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A South African university has told the Wellcome Sanger Institute to return DNA samples it has from indigenous African communities, The Times reports.

The University of California, Berkeley's Rasmus Nielsen and Xinzhu Wei have retracted their CCR5 gene paper due to a technical artifact.

 

University of Virginia researchers are exploring a genetic risk test to gauge type 1 diabetes risk, NPR reports.

In PNAS this week: researchers compare two high-grade neuroendocrine lung cancers, height among ancient Europeans, and more.