microfluidic chips

The Fraunhofer USA team will partner with a Fraunhofer Society institute in Germany in order to reduce the cost for its patented microchip that detects viruses including Ebola.

The company's microchip-based technology will detect viral and bacterial genetic material using both isothermal amplification and electrochemical measurements.

Researchers combined a microfluidic technology called the CTC-iChip with digital PCR to potentially improve cancer detection in hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

SMiLE-seq combines antibody arrays, mechanical trapping, and next-generation sequencing readouts to provide a new platform for characterizing DNA-protein interactions.

With an initial focus on exosome biology, the technology giant is looking for ways to use the microfluidic chip, which can sort particles as small as 20 nanometers.

The non-profit group is interested in improving manufacturing efficiencies to make point-of-care diagnostics more accessible. 

The technology is being used to analyze pathogen samples in a clinical study examining methods to combat recurrent drug-resistant Staph infections.

Researchers hope to advance the technology to support an assay to help personalize oral cancer treatment by avoiding the development of mucositis.

Two new projects announced last week will showcase organ-on-chip technology developed at the Wyss Institute.

The partners will leverage IME's rare cell isolation technology, a microchip containing a microfabricated filter membrane to isolate and enrich fetal cells from maternal blood.

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University of California, San Diego, researchers have developed a gene drive to control a fruit-destroying fly.

A new study of a β-thalassemia gene therapy appears promising, according to NPR.

In Nature this week: hair color genes, hybridization between 13-year and 17-year cicadas, and more.

Futurism writes that gene doping could be the next generation of cheating in sports.