microfluidic chips | GenomeWeb

microfluidic chips

Researchers combined a microfluidic technology called the CTC-iChip with digital PCR to potentially improve cancer detection in hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

SMiLE-seq combines antibody arrays, mechanical trapping, and next-generation sequencing readouts to provide a new platform for characterizing DNA-protein interactions.

With an initial focus on exosome biology, the technology giant is looking for ways to use the microfluidic chip, which can sort particles as small as 20 nanometers.

The non-profit group is interested in improving manufacturing efficiencies to make point-of-care diagnostics more accessible. 

The technology is being used to analyze pathogen samples in a clinical study examining methods to combat recurrent drug-resistant Staph infections.

Researchers hope to advance the technology to support an assay to help personalize oral cancer treatment by avoiding the development of mucositis.

Two new projects announced last week will showcase organ-on-chip technology developed at the Wyss Institute.

The partners will leverage IME's rare cell isolation technology, a microchip containing a microfabricated filter membrane to isolate and enrich fetal cells from maternal blood.

Everything on a Chip

With more and more organs-on-a-chip in development, researchers may someday be able to pull together a 'body-on-a-chip.'

The portable analyzer runs an RT-qPCR-based Ebola assay and takes about 75 minutes to detect the presence of the virus from whole blood.

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In Science this week: intellectual property landscape of CRISPR genome editing, and more.

A researcher has been convicted of conspiring to steal genetically engineered rice, Reuters reports.

Harvard Medical School's George Church says a woolly mammoth-elephant hybrid is only a few years away, according to the New Scientist.

Intel is ending its sponsorship of the International Science and Engineering Fair, the New York Times reports.