The company said it will use the proceeds for, among other things, the continued development of its microdroplet-based single-molecule DNA sequencing technology.

Microfluidics firm Dolomite said this week that it has licensed microdroplet generation technology from the Japan Science and Technology Agency.

SUNY researchers are developing a droplet microfluidics device to extract mRNA from single cells, creating cDNA libraries in individual droplets for gene expression analysis.

RainDance also announced the commercial launch of the first product resulting from the collaboration: consumable chips for use on RainDance's RDT 1000 instrument for sequence enrichment and targeted sequencing applications.

The firm will use the funds to support development and commercialization efforts for new applications including single-molecule digital PCR and single-cell analysis.

The company claims that compared to other targeted sequence-enrichment methods, its approach leads to more uniform coverage, or less enrichment bias. RainDance said it plans to offer up to 4,000 amplifications in a single tube later this year.

Robert Redfield is floated as the next director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Washington Post reports.

The New York Times writes that the National Institutes of Health's All of Us Research Program is "ambitious" and that some are concerned it might be overly so.

Representative Lamar Smith's criticism of the National Science Foundation has "changed the nature of the conversation," according to ScienceInsider.

In PLOS this week: non-coding RNA function in yeast, transcriptomic profiles of malaria parasites, and more.