methylome sequencing

The researchers said the method can help subtype and identify rare cells with clinical implications in neurodevelopment and cancer.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genome-editing to treat hearing loss in mice, juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia subgroups, and more.

Peking University researchers performed single-cell methylome sequencing on preimplantation cells to examine DNA methylation changes during early development.

Investigators identified dozens of neuronal subtypes in mouse and human brain samples using single-cell methylation sequencing, including a new neuronal subtype.

The test, which detects DNA methylation markers, is being developed as an alternative to invasive cystoscopy, the current standard of care.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: methylation patterns trace cell-free DNA to tissue of origin, cell surface proteome of Ewing sarcoma tumor cells, and more.

The team said their approach may have several applications, including evaluation of cellular response to therapies, and early diagnosis of diseases like cancer.

Researchers have found that normal tissue located near breast tumors exhibits epigenetic changes that may portend predisposition to disease.

University of Liverpool researchers analyzed methylation in the wheat genome to find variations in subgenome-specific methylation.

The researchers published a proof of principle in Nature Communications of a panel designed to look at epigenetic variation in adipose tissue and are using it to study obesity and metabolic syndromes. 

Pages

American scientists find themselves once again warning the Trump administration not to dismiss science, the New Yorker report.

A new study suggests CRISPR could be used to save coral reefs from dying off, Forbes reports.

Researchers have found that the i-motif shape of DNA previously observed in the lab also exists in human cells, and that it may serve a purpose.

In PNAS this week: a genomic, transcriptomic, and metabolomic analysis of the tea plant, Arabidopsis thaliana's adaptations to specific local environments, and more.