LC/MS

Otzi gastrointestinal tract.

An analysis of stomach and gastrointestinal samples suggests the Iceman munched on a high-fat diet of ibex, red deer, and einkorn plants before his final hike.

Using omics and other data, researchers performed  network analyses that pointed to interactions between human herpesviruses and other Alzheimer's disease risk factors.

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: two waves of Denisovan-human mixing, open chromatin accessibility patterns during embryogenesis, and more.

A proteomic and targeted exome sequencing study of diffuse-type gastric cancer led to proteomic subtypes with distinct mutation, survival, and potential treatment patterns.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: genetic variants associated with HIV infection risk, protein biomarkers of schistosomiasis, and more.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: COLEC10 linked to craniofacial development, transcripts and peptides of spider venom, and more.

The WUSTL-developed method detects a bile acid that is found at increased levels in Niemann-Pick patients, and is ready for pilot testing, its developers said.

At next week's workshop on the validation of LC/MS-based protein and peptide tests, the FDA hopes to determine what it needs to demand from test developers.

Agilent will provide technology and training for the jointly-run lab, expanding on a 2011 deal to open a microarray technology center at Monash University Malaysia.

Scientists from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology and Kyoto University have found 14 metabolites whose levels differ in older individuals' blood.

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Women with breast or ovarian cancer living in medically underserved regions of the US are less likely to get recommended BRCA1 or BRCA2 genetic testing, according to a new study.

Three immunology researchers are to receive this year's Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research, the Albany Times-Union reports.

In Genome Research this week: clonal evolution analysis of acute myeloid leukemia, computational pipeline to examine relationships between bacterial pathogens, and more.

Elephants may have "re-animated" a pseudogene to help stave off cancer, according to the New York Times.