laser capture microdissection | GenomeWeb

laser capture microdissection

Researchers at Rotterdam's Erasmus University Medical Center have identified an 11-protein signature that appears to distinguish between more and less aggressive forms of triple-negative breast cancer.

Researchers from George Mason University have completed an analysis of samples and data from the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project that indicates that laser capture microdissection of tumor samples could improve proteomic analyses.

A recent investigation by the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Genome Atlas consortium into the genetic underpinnings of breast tumors also offers a glimpse of the benefits of including proteomic data in such analyses.

Molecular diagnostics firm Theranostics Health plans to commercially launch the first of its TheraLink diagnostic assays by the first quarter of next year, company officials told ProteoMonitor this week.

The researchers are now using the signatures in trials examining the effectiveness of several breast cancer prevention agents and working to develop a prognostic for stratifying precancer patients according to their chances of progressing to cancer.

Petricoin said the database could help physicians make better treatment decisions, aid pharmaceutical firms' drug-development efforts, and uncover new indications for existing therapies.

The company will work with Semmelweis University to develop micromethods for handling small biosamples for microarray analysis.

Biomedical research projects are generating a ton of data that still needs to be analyzed, NPR reports.

Theranos is retiring some of its board members, including Henry Kissinger and George Shultz, Business Insider reports.

The heads of 29 scientific societies and some 2,300 researchers call on President-elect Donald Trump to rely on and support science in two separate letters.

In Science this week: genetically modified flu virus could be key to new live vaccines, and more.