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immune repertoire sequencing

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – A Rockefeller University researcher plans to use a $1.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a novel method for applying high-throughput sequencing to the study of human immune system function.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Atreca today announced it has licensed immune repertoire capture technology from Stanford University, which the biopharmaceutical company will develop for a broad range of applications.

The three-year, proof-of-principle project is funded through a $1 million grant from the Keck Foundation. If successful, it could be a step toward the use of sequencing as a replacement for current titering methods to diagnose infection.

The company said that it will eventually provide diagnostic and prognostic tests, as well as monitoring, for infection, auto-immune diseases, and cancer.

Sequencing the immune repertoire could provide important insights into the nature of disease and infection, and new companies that offer such sequencing and analysis have recently sprung up.

Company executives have a patent pending that describes methods “for using DNA sequencing to identify personalized biomarkers in patients with autoimmune disease and other conditions,” according to the recently published patent application.

Some researchers are looking at short-read platforms such as the Illumina Genome Analyzer for immunogenetics applications, but a 454 official said that the long read lengths of the company's platform — currently in the range of 400 or more base pairs — make it ideal for immunogenetics research.

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