genetic engineering

In Genome Biology this week: dynamics of sex-determining regions in brown algae, genome-engineering software tool, and more.

From Mosquito to Moth

The bioengineering firm Oxitec is developing a moth to stop an agricultural pest, Wired reports.

The National Security Agency monitored signal intelligence for signs of "nefarious" genetic engineering projects, Gizmodo reports.

The authors framed their report as a guidebook to help regulatory agencies across the globe coordinate "consistent" rules while allowing for societal differences.

IDT has licensed the CRISPR/Cpf1 RNA-guided editing system from the Broad Institute and intends to sell it to pharmaceutical and other commercial labs.

The firms will continue to develop strains of algae that demonstrate improved photosynthetic efficiency and oil production.

Oh, Turn It Off

Researchers uncover anti-CRISPR proteins that could help genetic engineering to be safer.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: deep phenotyping of xeroderma pigmentosum, role of PREX2 mutations in melanoma development, and more.

Wired writes that CRISPR could change the world — in many imaginative ways — and whether it will be for the better is still in the air.

The recent funding round follows $25 million that the company raised in January 2010.

Pages

Gene drives might run into biological resistance, the Economist reports.

Forensic experts exhumed painter Salvador Dalí's body to collect DNA for a paternity test, CBS News reports.

Yale Environment 360 writes that synthetic and conservation biologists aren't always on the same wavelength, but they are trying to reach an understanding.

In Science this week: full CRISPR locus integration complex structure, and more.