genetic engineering

New Skin

Genetically engineered cells help treat a boy with a rare genetic skin condition, the Los Angeles Times reports.

For Bananas

BBC News reports that Australian researchers are using genetic engineering to make disease-resistant bananas.

The investment bank began coverage with an Outperform rating, noting that Horizon's recent acquisition of Dharmacon is highly complementary and synergistic.

True Blue

By introducing genes from butterfly peas and Canterbury bells, researchers in Japan have developed a blue chrysanthemum, according to NPR.

In Genome Biology this week: dynamics of sex-determining regions in brown algae, genome-engineering software tool, and more.

From Mosquito to Moth

The bioengineering firm Oxitec is developing a moth to stop an agricultural pest, Wired reports.

The National Security Agency monitored signal intelligence for signs of "nefarious" genetic engineering projects, Gizmodo reports.

The authors framed their report as a guidebook to help regulatory agencies across the globe coordinate "consistent" rules while allowing for societal differences.

IDT has licensed the CRISPR/Cpf1 RNA-guided editing system from the Broad Institute and intends to sell it to pharmaceutical and other commercial labs.

The firms will continue to develop strains of algae that demonstrate improved photosynthetic efficiency and oil production.


Robert Redfield is floated as the next director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Washington Post reports.

The New York Times writes that the National Institutes of Health's All of Us Research Program is "ambitious" and that some are concerned it might be overly so.

Representative Lamar Smith's criticism of the National Science Foundation has "changed the nature of the conversation," according to ScienceInsider.

In PLOS this week: non-coding RNA function in yeast, transcriptomic profiles of malaria parasites, and more.