gene signature | GenomeWeb

gene signature

A team led by University of Toronto researchers developed the signature as a clinical assay that could predict treatment response.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: gene mutation signatures linked to tobacco smoke, and more.

Researchers have developed a gene expression signature of healthy aging that can identify people at risk of Alzheimer's disease.

The study results also offer hints to new pathways that might be targeted to overcome resistance to currently used DNA methyltransferase inhibitors.

Led by former LabCorp executives, the firm is aiming to develop evidence around genetic signatures and license the tech to labs and Dx developers.

Skyline will collaborate with Janssen to develop a test to identify patients at increased risk of side effects from a multiple myeloma drug.

Researchers have identified several gene expression signatures that predict a patient's sensitivity to adjuvant chemotherapy. A test based on the findings could help identify which patients will do well with current treatments, and which might benefit from entering a clinical trial.

The researchers found that treatment with lactate and ketones causes cancer cells to express gene profiles associated with “stemness.” They believe that these gene signatures could, in turn, predict poor clinical outcome in breast cancer patients.

Under the terms of the partnership, Samsung will provide samples from Korean patients. Pfizer, in turn, will conduct genomic profiling on the samples and analyze the data in order to link gene signatures to patient outcomes.

In Science this week: intellectual property landscape of CRISPR genome editing, and more.

A researcher has been convicted of conspiring to steal genetically engineered rice, Reuters reports.

Harvard Medical School's George Church says a woolly mammoth-elephant hybrid is only a few years away, according to the New Scientist.

Intel is ending its sponsorship of the International Science and Engineering Fair, the New York Times reports.