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gene editing

In Nature this week: GWAS of cigarette smoking behaviors, set of gene expression predictors for schizophrenia, and more.

That's a Lot of Edits

Harvard Medical School's George Church and his colleagues report in a preprint that they made more than 13,000 genome edits to a single cell.

The company has initial financing of $35 million, and has licensed its foundational SHERLOCK and INSPECTR technologies from the Broad and Harvard, respectively.

A WHO panel is calling for a global registry of human germline gene-editing projects, according to Stat News.

The agriculture company said it will use the technology it has licensed for new applications in crop editing and for research to bring new foods to market.

Japan is to release rules governing some gene-edited food, according to NHK World.

Eighteen researchers call for a temporary stop to all clinical uses of human germline editing in a piece appearing in Nature.

In Nature this week: benchmarking framework for variant calling, and more.

A statement from NIH Director Francis Collins follows a call by scientists for the moratorium pending the creation of a framework to guide the use of heritable genome editing.

CRISPR technology has made its way around the world, but in the wake of the He Jiankui controversy, the industry is asking what recourse it has against misuse.

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According to Wired, Nebula Genomics is providing a way for people to get their genomes sequenced anonymously.

NPR says the explosion and fire earlier this week at a Russian lab that stores dangerous pathogens revives the question of whether such samples should be kept.

A 26-year-old woman tells Cosmopolitan about learning her APOE status at a young age.

In Science journals this week: a functional genomic screen uncovers drug combination that increases KRAS inhibitor efficacy in aggressive lung cancer, and more.