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Peking University-led researchers edited stem cells an HIV patient was treated with in an attempt to cure disease, the Associated Press reports.

In Nature this week: catalog of changes associated with gene knockouts in yeast, simultaneous profiling of three-dimensional genome structure and DNA methylation in single cells, and more.

The Genome Sensor — the first product Cardea will market under the Nanosens brand — will allow the user to Google a genome using a single guide RNA.

The companies also launched an early-access program for their first CRISPR-Chip-based product, the Genome Sensor.

The team found that base editors that exhibit RNA off-target editing can also self-edit their own transcripts, leading to heterogeneity in their coding sequences.

Even as the chip is being used to detect diseases, its inventors are also finding that the it can be used to validate other CRISPR-based technologies.

The researchers will evaluate recent developments in human genome editing as well as responses from the public and scientific communities.

The team tested the system in living mice with progeria, inserting a normal copy of the LMNA gene into the animals to diminish features of the disease.

In a point-counterpoint in the Boston Globe, researchers discuss the potential of gene editing to prevent Lyme disease, but also the pitfalls of doing so.

In Science this week: atlas of malaria parasites' gene expression across their life cycles, and more.

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Retraction Watch writes that a cancer researcher has had an eighth paper retracted.

Computational biologist James Taylor has died, according to Johns Hopkins University.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is starting to test people for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, according to the New York Times.

In PLOS this week: features of tumor-infiltrating immune cells, regulatory effects of SNPs associated with prostate cancer risk, and more.