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By a GenomeWeb staff reporter NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – French firm Cellectis and North Carolina-based Precision Biosciences have filed two new suits against each other alleging infringement of US patents covering modified meganucleases.

Using a combination of multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE) and conjugative assembly genome engineering (CAGE), a research team has generated bacterial strains in which one stop codon has been replaced with another.

The research partners will use induced pluripotent stem cells and zinc-finger nuclease editing tools to study a genetic desert region linked to coronary artery disease.

The TAL Effector technology allows for the design of proteins that bind to any specified sequence of DNA — an approach that promises precise functional control over genetic circuitry.

Cellectis is targeting global distribution of its Talen Access service and Wako will allow the firm to enter the Japanese market "effectively."

The two parties will collaborate on creating a gene editing process in inducible human pluripotent stem cells.

The grants come from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the US Department of the Treasury, the National Institutes of Health, and the state of North Carolina.

The two patents deal with DNA vectors that can be used in gene mapping and site-directed gene insertion, and are related to a different pair of patents already under reexamination at the USPTO.

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23andMe has a holiday popup shop at a mall and could open additional stores, Bloomberg reports.

By studying koalas and a retrovirus that infects them, researchers may have uncovered a new sort of 'immune response' that occurs at the genomic level, Agence France Presse reports.

NPR reports that the first person in the US given a gene editing-based therapy for a genetic disorder is heading home.

In Science this week: ancient genomes reveal social inequality within individual households, new method for quantifying genetic variation in gene dosage, and more.