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gene editing

Two new grants are helping the company develop its SHERLOCK and INSPECTR technologies as the basis for creating innovative diagnostics.

In Science this week: a review says lifestyles of industrialized societies may be threatening needed gut microbial communities, and more.

Russian CRISPR researcher moves along with plans to ultimately alter the genes of embryos of deaf couples, though awaits regulatory approval, Nature News reports.

The prime editing technique has strengths that are complementary to nuclease-based editing and base editing.

Bound for Home

NPR reports that the first person in the US given a gene editing-based therapy for a genetic disorder is heading home.

The system uses the Cas13 nuclease to identify target sites in various RNA viruses and then destroy them.

The company said its test is faster, more precise, and cheaper than the current gold standard Cepheid GeneXpert test.

The researchers repurposed type I variants of class 1 CRISPR systems to make them usable for DNA targeting and transcriptional control.

The firm said CRISPR will enable targeted sequencing of long regions of interest that were previously only accessible with long-read whole-genome sequencing.

The company, founded in May 2018 and headquartered in Guangzhou in southern China, has developed a CRISPR-based rapid diagnostics platform for pathogen detection.

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Retraction Watch writes that a cancer researcher has had an eighth paper retracted.

Computational biologist James Taylor has died, according to Johns Hopkins University.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is starting to test people for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, according to the New York Times.

In PLOS this week: features of tumor-infiltrating immune cells, regulatory effects of SNPs associated with prostate cancer risk, and more.