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gene editing

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: GWAS of cigarette smoking behaviors, set of gene expression predictors for schizophrenia, and more.

That's a Lot of Edits

Harvard Medical School's George Church and his colleagues report in a preprint that they made more than 13,000 genome edits to a single cell.

The company has initial financing of $35 million, and has licensed its foundational SHERLOCK and INSPECTR technologies from the Broad and Harvard, respectively.

A WHO panel is calling for a global registry of human germline gene-editing projects, according to Stat News.

The agriculture company said it will use the technology it has licensed for new applications in crop editing and for research to bring new foods to market.

Japan is to release rules governing some gene-edited food, according to NHK World.

Eighteen researchers call for a temporary stop to all clinical uses of human germline editing in a piece appearing in Nature.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: benchmarking framework for variant calling, and more.

A statement from NIH Director Francis Collins follows a call by scientists for the moratorium pending the creation of a framework to guide the use of heritable genome editing.

CRISPR technology has made its way around the world, but in the wake of the He Jiankui controversy, the industry is asking what recourse it has against misuse.

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University of Idaho researchers model the scientific discovery process to examine the link between reproducibility and scientific truth.

A bill passed by a US House of Representatives appropriations subcommittee would give scientific agencies including the National Science Foundation boosts in funding.

Relocating USDA agencies outside of Washington, DC, may make them less effective, critics of the move tell NPR.

In PLOS this week: genes that help Borrelia burgdorferi survive in ticks, CiliaCarta collection of about 1,000 suspected cilia genes, and more.