FRET

By Ben Butkus
Biosearch Technologies said today that it has acquired worldwide rights from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey to patents covering "non-FRET" nucleic acid probe technology.

The new test will be based on real-time PCR using fluorescence resonance energy transfer probes for detection.

The scientist has founded consulting firm Perpetual Genomics to license the technology, which would be a "true universal library" of extremely short FRET-based PCR probes that could allow manufacturers to sell probes fractionally and significantly reduce their cost.

Sometimes genetic tests give inconclusive results and provide little reassurance to patients, the Associated Press reports.

Vox wonders whether gene-editing crops will be viewed similarly as genetically modified organisms of if people will give them a try.

In Science this week: research regulation and reporting requirement reform, and more.

With H3Africa, Charles Rotimi has been working to bolster the representation of African participants and African researchers in genomics, Newsweek reports.