FRET

By Ben Butkus
Biosearch Technologies said today that it has acquired worldwide rights from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey to patents covering "non-FRET" nucleic acid probe technology.

The new test will be based on real-time PCR using fluorescence resonance energy transfer probes for detection.

The scientist has founded consulting firm Perpetual Genomics to license the technology, which would be a "true universal library" of extremely short FRET-based PCR probes that could allow manufacturers to sell probes fractionally and significantly reduce their cost.

The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative is investing in Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory's BioRxiv.

A study appearing in PLOS One finds that shortened consent forms don't affect clinical trial participants' understanding of the study.

The National Security Agency monitored signal intelligence for signs of "nefarious" genetic engineering projects, Gizmodo reports.

In Nature this week: barley genome sequenced, method for genotyping and phasing short tandem repeats, and more.