forensics

This Week in Science

In Science this week: open genetic genealogy databases can lead to the identification of individuals who have not sought testing, and more.

The two papers published today in Science and Cell have implications for both forensics and genetic research.

Minor Collection

A new California bill signed into law governs how law enforcement in the state can collect DNA samples from minors, according to the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

From Tusk to Cartel

Researchers report using genotyping to tie together illegal ivory shipments and trace them back to a handful of cartels, the New York Times reports.

The work is a step toward transitioning from PCR- and CE-based methods for STR profiling in forensics to NGS-based approaches.

Law enforcement officials have relied on genetic genealogy to make an arrest in a decade-old series of rapes, the Associated Press reports.

The system is designed to detect single amino acid polymorphisms in touch skin samples that can be used to identify specific people.

Face for the Suspect

Newport Beach police have turned to DNA phenotyping to generate images of a suspect in a 45-year-old murder, UPI reports.

Buzzfeed News reports that genetic genealogy has led to an arrest in a 1986 rape and murder case.

How Old Were They?

In a proof-of-concept study, researchers report being able to determine age from dried bloodstains, Discover's D-brief blog reports.

Pages

Hundreds of scientists have signed a letter criticizing the open-access Plan S, ScienceInsider reports.

NPR speaks with Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-Texas) about the US House of Representatives science committee.

A start-up company aiming to match cancer patients to treatments closes after about six weeks, Stat News reports.

In PLOS this week: somatic mutation associations unearthed in thousands of cancer exomes, pathogen detection assay, and more.