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forensic DNA testing

A recent conference discussed genetic genealogy in light of new US Department of Justice guidelines, the New York Times reports.

The Justice Department has issued an interim policy governing the use of genetic genealogy, according to CNET.

The Los Angeles Times reports on concerns regarding rapid DNA analysis by law enforcement.

Wildlife forensic investigators are using DNA sequencing and other forensic tools to address wildlife crime, according to BBC Future.

And Maybe a Fee

The owner of the GEDmatch website tells CBS12 he is considering charging law enforcement a fee to use the site.

DNA for Attorneys

Virginia's Department of Forensic Science is offering attorneys a course on DNA testing, the Virginian-Pilot reports.

CFSRE recently validated Verogen's NGS-based forensics platform and will develop implementation and training materials for law enforcement.

Fox News reports that rapid DNA testing is being used to identify victims of the Santa Barbara boat fire.

Search Decisions

The Wall Street Journal looks into FamilyTreeDNA's handling of genetic genealogy searches by law enforcement.

Two Utah cases represent the promise and pitfalls of using genetic genealogy in law enforcement, the Salt Lake Tribune reports.

Pages

Russian CRISPR researcher moves along with plans to ultimately alter the genes of embryos of deaf couples, though awaits regulatory approval, Nature News reports.

University of California, San Francisco, researchers have uncovered a gene mutations that appears to make a father-son duo more efficient sleepers.

NPR reports a large health insurer has begun to cover some pharmacogenetic tests for psychiatric drugs.

In PLOS this week: genome-wide association study of non-syndromic orofacial cleft subtypes, epigenetic and transcriptomic analysis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and more.