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forensic DNA testing

A new pilot program aims to identify DNA matches between Florida felons and unsolved crimes nationwide.

NBC Bay Area reports a California lab has been certified to conduct forensic mitochondrial DNA sequencing.

The New York City Police Department will be removing DNA profiles from a local database if they are from people who were never convicted of a crime, the New York Times reports.

And Out

A genetic genealogy analysis helped secure the release of a California man from prison after getting his murder conviction overturned, the Guardian reports.

No Access

Buzzfeed News reports that Family Tree DNA declined to give Parabon Nanolabs access to its database.

As 2020 dawns, forensic genomics is poised for growth as companies aim to harness the power of consumer databases coupled with advances in sequencing.

The Deseret News reports on an effort in Utah to prevent "dragnet-style" searches of consumer genetic databases.

Verogen will gain access to GEDmatch's database of genetic profiles, although users can choose whether law enforcement can search their data to solve violent crimes.

According to the Associated Press, police in Germany are seeking DNA samples from 900 men to tackle a cold case.

Against the Plan

An opinion piece at The Hill criticizes the proposed plan to collect DNA samples from migrants at the US border.

Pages

New analyses indicate female researchers are publishing less during the coronavirus pandemic than male researchers, according to Nature News.

A study suggests people with the ApoE e4 genotype may be more likely to have severe COVID-19 than those with other genotypes, the Guardian says.

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies are searching for a genetic reason for why some people, but not others, become gravely ill with COVID-19, the Detroit Free Press reports.

In PNAS this week: forward genetics-base analysis of retinal development, interactions of T cell receptors with neoantigens in colorectal cancer, and more.