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ELISA

Shares of the Boulder, Colorado-based firm will begin trading on the Nasdaq today under ticker symbol "BDSX" at $18 per share.

The firm uses a miniaturized, bead-based-ELISA format to multiplex hundreds to thousands of immunoassays rapidly and without antibody cross-reactivity.

The Economist writes that two kinds of testing are important to control the spread of COVID-19.

The San Francisco-based startup believes that its QiSant assay could help guide the use of immunosuppressive drugs and other therapies to prevent kidney transplant rejection.

In PLOS this week: loci linked to vitamin D metabolism, rapid diagnostic for Chagas disease, and more.

The UCSF spinout aims to develop noninvasive tests to detect kidney injury for the transplantation field and to diagnose and monitor chronic disease.

Researchers identified a handful of microbes associated with spontaneous preterm birth, and highlighted host immune protein levels with potential ties to the condition.

The company said that diagnostic testing volumes, product and royalty revenues, and clinical services revenues all fell year over year.

Using the publicly available ImmPort database, researchers standardized and analyzed immune-related data for more than 10,300 healthy individuals.

CEO Anders Rylander said the company will initially market its DiviTum assay for breast cancer cases, though it could be used to monitor cell proliferation in all cancer types.

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A survey by Nature finds that most researchers want scientific meetings to continue virtually or with a virtual component, even after the pandemic ends.

Bloomberg reports that the B.1.351 SARS-CoV-2 viral variant could prompt the formulation of better vaccines.

Certain blood proteins may be able to distinguish COVID-19 patients who will become critically ill from those who will not, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports.

In Genome Biology this week: algorithm to assess regulatory features, approach to integrate multiple single-cell RNA-seq datasets, and more.