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ELISA

The firm uses a miniaturized, bead-based-ELISA format to multiplex hundreds to thousands of immunoassays rapidly and without antibody cross-reactivity.

The Economist writes that two kinds of testing are important to control the spread of COVID-19.

The San Francisco-based startup believes that its QiSant assay could help guide the use of immunosuppressive drugs and other therapies to prevent kidney transplant rejection.

In PLOS this week: loci linked to vitamin D metabolism, rapid diagnostic for Chagas disease, and more.

The UCSF spinout aims to develop noninvasive tests to detect kidney injury for the transplantation field and to diagnose and monitor chronic disease.

Researchers identified a handful of microbes associated with spontaneous preterm birth, and highlighted host immune protein levels with potential ties to the condition.

The company said that diagnostic testing volumes, product and royalty revenues, and clinical services revenues all fell year over year.

Using the publicly available ImmPort database, researchers standardized and analyzed immune-related data for more than 10,300 healthy individuals.

CEO Anders Rylander said the company will initially market its DiviTum assay for breast cancer cases, though it could be used to monitor cell proliferation in all cancer types.

The company's diagnostics business saw 8 percent growth, while its Covance segment retreated 2 percent. The firm lowered its adjusted EPS estimate for the full year. 

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The World Health Organization will be providing low-cost COVID-19 tests to low- and middle-income nations, according to Reuters.

Nature News examines how the confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett to the US Supreme Court could affect scientific agencies.

Nobel Prize-winner Arthur Ashkin, who developed optical tweezers, has died at 98, the Washington Post reports.

In PNAS this week: altered gene expression in brain samples from Alzheimer's disease patients, effects of gene mutations found in bladder cancer, and more.