DTC genetic testing

Gencove, a New York Genome Center spinout, will provide its low-pass sequencing solution to Onegevity's multi-omic artificial intelligence platform and services. 

NPE Support

Fox10 in Phoenix reports on a Facebook-based support group for people who learn through direct-to-consumer genetic testing that a parent isn't a biological parent.

Wired reviews three different DNA tests using two dogs to find they gave varying results.

Is It Useful?

The New York Times warns in an editorial that 23andMe health risk tests may not provide useful information.

Unexpected Kits

In a bid to amass hard-to-trace gift cards from a refer-a-friend program, hackers ordered 2,400 DNA ancestry testing kits for strangers, according to USA Today.

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing firm 23andMe has a newly cleared colorectal cancer risk test.

The clearance enables 23andMe to report on the two most common variations in the MUTYH gene influencing MAP, which increases risk of CRC development.

Identical twins receive different estimates of ancestry from the same direct-to-consumer genetic testing firms, CBC reports.

Cracking Old Cases

The Washington Post looks into how criminal investigators are using genetic genealogy in cold cases.

With ever more data in hand, providers are seeking to enhance their services, providing more detailed ancestry estimates while introducing new offerings around genetic traits and health.

Pages

The World Health Organization has announced the members of its gene-editing committee, according to NPR.

DARPA is working on developing algorithms that gauge the credibility of research findings, Wired reports.

The American Society of Breast Surgeons recommends all women diagnosed with breast cancer be offered genetic testing, the Washington Post says.

In Science this week: comparison of modern, historical rabbit exomes uncovers parallel evolution after myxoma virus exposure; and more.