DTC genetic testing

The company has contracted with a urologist, who will review customers' requests for tests, and prescribe the firm's epigenetics-based male fertility analysis.

Only a Few

Technology Review notes that states like Maryland and New York limit direct-to-consumer genetic testing.

Due to privacy and lab certification questions, the planned giveaway of Orig3n testing kits at a Baltimore Ravens game was suspended.

New Siblings

The Sacramento Bee writes that direct-to-consumer genetic testing connected a woman to sperm donor-conceived half siblings.

Earlier this week, the company launched Genomic Explorer in the US, a web-based service that enables consumers to upload their genomic data for viewing and analysis.

Change Is Hard to Do

Genetic disease risk information doesn't always spur people to make healthy lifestyle changes, according to the Associated Press.

WBUR in Boston looks into Orig3n's genetic fitness assessments to find more research is needed.

Poised for Upset

The Economist writes that predictive genetic testing may upset the insurance market.

With the rollout of Insitome's first app, consumers have the chance to explore their heritage in a new context that could reshape the ancestry testing market.

Unexpected Findings

Genetic ancestry testing led one woman to learn that her father and another baby boy had been switched at birth, the Washington Post reports.

Pages

Using DNA to sketch crime victims might not be a great idea, the NYTimes says.

Science has its own problem with sexual harassment. What do we do with the research these abusers produce, Wired asks.

Senate Republicans led by Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) are trying to change how the government funds basic research, reports ScienceInsider.

In Science this week: combining genomics and ecology to better understand the effects of natural selection on evolution, and more.