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CRISPR

Bound for Home

NPR reports that the first person in the US given a gene editing-based therapy for a genetic disorder is heading home.

The system uses the Cas13 nuclease to identify target sites in various RNA viruses and then destroy them.

Last week's SynBioBeta conference was indicative of the high degree of interest in the synthetic bio space from omics research tool vendors.

In Nature this week: researchers map evolution of monarch butterfly's resistance to cardiac glycoside toxins, and more.

Needs Plan Acceptance

Bloomberg reports that whether a Russian researcher moves ahead with his plan to edit the genomes of embryos may depend upon Russian President Vladimir Putin.

The Broad Institute spinout will develop its CRISPR-based Sherlock platform for battlefield-ready diagnostics for infectious disease agents.

The company said its test is faster, more precise, and cheaper than the current gold standard Cepheid GeneXpert test.

The researchers repurposed type I variants of class 1 CRISPR systems to make them usable for DNA targeting and transcriptional control.

Technology Review reports that sickle cell patients are optimistic about gene editing to treat their disease, but are worried about how available it will be.

The firm said CRISPR will enable targeted sequencing of long regions of interest that were previously only accessible with long-read whole-genome sequencing.

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23andMe has a holiday popup shop at a mall and could open additional stores, Bloomberg reports.

By studying koalas and a retrovirus that infects them, researchers may have uncovered a new sort of 'immune response' that occurs at the genomic level, Agence France Presse reports.

NPR reports that the first person in the US given a gene editing-based therapy for a genetic disorder is heading home.

In Science this week: ancient genomes reveal social inequality within individual households, new method for quantifying genetic variation in gene dosage, and more.