CRISPR

This Week in Science

In Science this week: intellectual property experts argue patent battles such as the one over CRISPR are wasteful, and more.

A lawyer and a scientist say the best result in the CRISPR patent fight would be narrow patents that prevent anyone from controlling downstream innovation.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genome sequence of wheat progenitor Aegilops tauschii, and more.

The wide-ranging discussion with witnesses from Stanford, Johns Hopkins, and Editas Medicine touched on recent advances in research and questions of safety.

The MIT-led team that developed the delivery technique said that it was able to induce more than 80 percent editing of the Pcsk9 gene in the livers of mice. 

The IP is based on the research of Emmanuelle Charpentier from the Hannover Medical School in Germany and Umea University in Sweden.

CRISPR On Your Own

Scientific American looks into how easy it is for an amateur to use the CRISPR gene-editing tool.

Syngenta said that it is using CRISPR-Cas9 in multiple crops including corn, wheat, tomato, rice, and sunflower.

Bye, Pests

Radio New Zealand discusses the potential use of gene drives for controlling pest populations.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: new version of CRISPR that targets RNA, and more.

Pages

The US Food and Drug Administration has new guidelines that enable some gene and cell therapies to undergo expedited review, according to the New York Times.

Using gene drives to control invasive species might be too risky, an initial advocate of the approach says.

In Science this week: intellectual property experts argue patent battles such as the one over CRISPR are wasteful, and more.

Researchers have grown tumors in 3D cell cultures to better understand cancer, the Economist reports.