CRISPR

Reuters reports that UK researchers are using gene-editing tools to develop flu-resistant chickens.

The nuclease, which comes from Bacillus hisashii, has gain-of-function mutations that facilitate robust editing in human cell lines and primary human T cells.

Chinese state news agency Xinhua reports that a preliminary investigation has found He Jiankui performed his gene-editing work illegally.

They further found that cancers with inactivating mutations in MARK3 and other kinases are susceptible to alkylating chemotherapeutic agents.

The protease-activated Cas9 enzymes could reduce off-target effects and could be used to sense pathogens and trigger an immune response.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: large Alzheimer's disease GWAS uncovers novel loci, new CRISPR interference-based approach, and more.

Arbor Biosciences' portfolio includes custom DNA microarrays and oligonucleotide libraries, as well as a line of targeted sequencing panels.

"Doing Fine"

In a Twitter thread, Technology Review's Antonio Regalado says that He Jiankui is "doing fine" and that concerns about possible penalties are misplaced.

The Telegraph reports there are concerns He Jiankui, who announced the birth gene-edited embryos, might face the death penalty.

Researchers argue that gene editing could enable the development of spicy tomatoes, according to the Guardian.

Pages

Reuters reports that UK researchers are using gene-editing tools to develop flu-resistant chickens.

Nature calls for genomics to become part of the World Health Organization's cholera surveillance approach.

Vox explores a proposal to institute a lottery system to award grant funds.

In Genome Biology this week: gut microbiome study of individuals from Tanzania and Botswana, sixth version of the Network of Cancer Genes database, and more.