CNV arrays

An international team of researchers examined the scope and population specificity of copy-number variants affecting genes linked to drug metabolism.

Using CNV profiles for more than 40,000 individuals with or without schizophrenia, researchers got a refined look at gains and losses linked to the condition.

An analysis focused on large, rare de novo CNVs has identified copy number changes contributing to conotruncal heart disease in Chinese individuals.

Independent analyses on dozens of tumor-normal Sézary syndrome pairs points to frequent alterations in signaling, cell cycle, and epigenetic pathways.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – An array-based analysis by researchers from Australia and elsewhere has identified a gene that is often missing in ovarian cancers that become resistant to liposomal doxorubicin chemotherapy, hinting that it may serve as a marker for such acquired resistance.

By Molika Ashford
Advocacy group Autism Speaks has announced a partnership with Chinese genomics institute BGI to sequence the whole genomes of 10,000 individuals in families of children with autism spectrum disorder.

Independent research groups have used array and sequencing-based approaches to catalog CNVs in three Asian populations and gain insights into CNV breakpoint patterns in three individuals.

After looking for associations between common CNVs and eight common diseases in more than 16,000 affected individuals, members of the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium concluded that these CNVs aren't major players in these diseases.

Using array-based methods, researchers have mapped almost 12,000 potential copy number variants in the human genome and developed reference genotypes for almost 5,000 CNVs.

The US Food and Drug Administration has new guidelines that enable some gene and cell therapies to undergo expedited review, according to the New York Times.

Using gene drives to control invasive species might be too risky, an initial advocate of the approach says.

In Science this week: intellectual property experts argue patent battles such as the one over CRISPR are wasteful, and more.

Researchers have grown tumors in 3D cell cultures to better understand cancer, the Economist reports.