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cancer sequencing

The ranks of health centers utilizing next-gen sequencing in the care and treatment of cancer patients continue to swell with the recent adoption by two groups — Greenville Health System in South Carolina and the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in New York — of new targeted sequenc

Fox Chase Cancer Center has contracted genomics interpretation company N-of-One to interpret and curate results from its new targeted sequencing-based test, CancerCode45, creating reports for ordering physicians that link genomic findings with potential targeted therapies.

Through a newly created Institute for Precision Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College and New York Presbyterian Hospital plan to begin offering targeted, individualized treatment informed by patients' genomes.

The Fox Chase Cancer Center has begun offering targeted sequencing to inform cancer treatment using an adaptation of Life Technologies' Ion Torrent AmpliSeq Cancer Panel via its CLIA-certified laboratory.

Researchers from the Jackson Laboratory have begun using targeted sequencing to profile the lab's growing cohort of mouse avatar models — populations of mice engrafted with samples of a single patient's tumor.

University of Washington researchers have designed a sequencing method using complementary duplex DNA tags attached to both strands of a DNA molecule, which they reported can yield less than one error per billion nucleotides sequenced.

Complete Genomics this week launched a cancer sequencing service, adding to its existing human whole-genome sequencing service.

The researchers used next-generation sequencing, Sanger sequencing, and mass-spectrometric genotyping to examine samples from patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and found somatic mutations in 18 genes.

The Baylor researchers propose to sequence tumor-normal pairs with 60-fold coverage or more on two different sequencing platforms "to get a real handle on false positive and false negative rates that occur in cancer sequencing."

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The Wall Street Journal looks into FamilyTreeDNA's handling of genetic genealogy searches by law enforcement.

In a point-counterpoint in the Boston Globe, researchers discuss the potential of gene editing to prevent Lyme disease, but also the pitfalls of doing so.

MIT's Technology Review reports that researchers hope to develop a CRISPR-based pain therapy.

In Science this week: atlas of malaria parasites' gene expression across their life cycles, and more.