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The company reported $112.4 million in revenues compared to $83.2 million in Q4 2019, beating the average Wall Street estimate of $106.6 million.

The firm posted total software-related revenues of $18.6 million, up 1 percent from $18.4 million in Q4 2019.

The company is getting ready to offer cancer patients every type of molecular cancer diagnostics, including testing for minimal residual disease.

Spun out of the Glasgow Precision Oncology Laboratory, Gabriel wants targeted sequencing to become the norm for all somatic cancer patients.

University of Glasgow spinout Gabriel Precision Oncology will contribute a bioinformatics pipeline derived from cancer tissue samples to accelerate MDx adoption.

Last year, the company processed more than 1 million tests, most of them for its reproductive health business, but interest in Prospera and Signatera is growing. 

The firm also provided preliminary revenues of $950 million for Q4 and reinstated guidance of $3.79 billion to $3.88 billion for 2021.

Since the commercial launch of its technology last year, the firm has been validating it in studies with academic groups and pharmaceutical companies.

The deal builds on a non-exclusive partnership signed in January 2019 and PierianDx will now support three more Illumina cancer sequencing assays.

Increased incidental detection of clonal hematopoiesis and new considerations for mutations in myelodysplastic precursors herald improved precision medicine strategies.

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Politico reports that the NYPD DNA database has grown since it announced it would be removing profiles from it.

Forbes reports that a structural biology lab at Oxford University studying the coronavirus was hacked.

Science reports that a Dutch research funding agency is combating a ransomware attack.

In Science this week: set of 64 haplotype assemblies from 32 individuals, and more.