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Telehealth service provider GeneMatters is teaming with Clear Genetics to extend the reach of its genetic counselors for health systems and labs.

With the help of AI, blockchain, and a new cryptocurrency, Nebula wants to give patients more control of their genomic data.

The company is developing a platform for synthesizing biomedical knowledge from scientific, regulatory, and commercial literature.

The companies will pair Freenome's AI genomics platform with various Qiagen molecular analysis platforms and co-market the technologies to pharmaceutical companies.

The partners will develop and implement bioinformatics tools, pipelines, and techniques to improve molecular profiling for research and clinical oncology.

George Church's Nebula is teaming with Hong Kong startup Longenesis to create a secure platform for individuals and biobanks to sell access to their genomes.

With the Series B funding, Sytenkabio will consolidate its headquarters in Seoul, validate its technology, and look to expand into international markets.

Freenome will leverage proteomics firm Biognosys' technology to add protein quantification to the development of Freenome's first commercially available screening test.

The partnership will allow Serosep's customers to benefit from standardized diagnostic interpretation supported by artificial intelligence and automation.

ReviveMed's technology uses artificial intelligence-based analysis of metabolomics data for drug discovery and development.

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Mainichi reports that 43 percent of Japanese individuals said they did not want to eat agricultural products that had been modified using gene-editing tools.

Two US Department of Agriculture research departments are moving to the Kansas City area, according to the Washington Post.

Slate's Jane Hu compares some at-home genetic tests to astrology.

In PLOS this week: analysis of polygenic risk scores for skin cancer, chronic pain GWAS, and more.