arrayer

By Justin Petrone
The National Institutes of Health is looking for a partner to commercialize a new tissue microarrayer that its inventor claims could cost one-tenth the price of similar instruments on the market.

Besides the new InnoStamp arrayer, which relies on magnetic stamps to print arrays, the French company plans to launch an infrared version of its InnoScan 710 scanner.

As part of the deal, KTH will also serve as a reference site for Arrayjet, and the two organizations will work together on publications and technology development.

Phadia will use the 2470 in its research efforts to characterize new allergens and to discover biomarker signatures that can be used in the molecular diagnosis of allergies and autoimmune diseases.

The UK's Human Fertility and Embryology Authority calls for consumer genetic testing companies to warn customers that testing could uncover family secrets, according to the Guardian.

The New York Times reports that United Nations delegates have been discussing how to govern the genetic resources of the deep sea.

Researchers have transplanted edited cells into mice that appear to combat cocaine addiction, New Scientist reports.

In PNAS this week: analysis of proteolytic enzymes secreted by circulating tumor cells, phylogenetic study of Fv1 evolution, and more.