arrayer

By Justin Petrone
The National Institutes of Health is looking for a partner to commercialize a new tissue microarrayer that its inventor claims could cost one-tenth the price of similar instruments on the market.

Besides the new InnoStamp arrayer, which relies on magnetic stamps to print arrays, the French company plans to launch an infrared version of its InnoScan 710 scanner.

As part of the deal, KTH will also serve as a reference site for Arrayjet, and the two organizations will work together on publications and technology development.

Phadia will use the 2470 in its research efforts to characterize new allergens and to discover biomarker signatures that can be used in the molecular diagnosis of allergies and autoimmune diseases.

Cancer researcher Alan Rabson has died at 92, the New York Times reports.

As the National Guideline Clearinghouse goes dark, the ECRI Institute says it will pick up the slack.

In Genome Research this week: sequencing method examines proteins parasite uses to evade immune system, L1 insertions in cancer, and more.

The Atlantic reports on private Facebook support groups for people who receive unexpected parentage results from direct-to-consumer genetic tests.