arrayer

By Justin Petrone
The National Institutes of Health is looking for a partner to commercialize a new tissue microarrayer that its inventor claims could cost one-tenth the price of similar instruments on the market.

Besides the new InnoStamp arrayer, which relies on magnetic stamps to print arrays, the French company plans to launch an infrared version of its InnoScan 710 scanner.

As part of the deal, KTH will also serve as a reference site for Arrayjet, and the two organizations will work together on publications and technology development.

Phadia will use the 2470 in its research efforts to characterize new allergens and to discover biomarker signatures that can be used in the molecular diagnosis of allergies and autoimmune diseases.

The United Nations is to consider a ban on field testing gene drives at a meeting being held next week, Technology Review reports.

The Associated Press reports that gene-edited food may soon be for sale.

The US Department of Health and Human Services is beginning a series of meetings on human fetal tissue research, Stat News reports.

In Cell this week: epigenetic change linked to glioblastomas, rare and low-frequency variants contributing to multiple sclerosis risk, and more.