Oxford Nanopore | GenomeWeb

Oxford Nanopore

Oxford Nanopore Technologies was founded in 2005 to develop an electronic, single molecule sensing system based on nanopore science. The company now has more than 250 employees from multiple disciplines including nanopore science, molecular biology and applications, informatics, engineering, electronics, manufacturing and commercialization. Oxford Nanopore's instruments — MinIon, PromethIon, and GridIon are adaptable for the analysis of DNA, RNA, proteins, small molecules and other types of molecule.

Oxford Nanopore Facts


CEO: Gordon Sanghera

Website: www.nanoporetech.com

Ticker symbol: Privately held

Headquarters: Oxford, UK

Number of employees: 250+

During a live webcast, CTO Clive Brown provided an update on the company's development plans and upcoming updates.

The next step to sequencing organisms found on the ISS or in space is to automate sample and library prep, according to a NASA microbiologist.

Researchers have shown that metagenomic sequencing on the MinIon can identify the pathogen and antimicrobial resistance profile of UTIs in several hours. 

The researchers demonstrated their Nanocall software on both E. coli and human DNA samples, showing it is comparable to an older version of the cloud-based software.

Under the terms of the settlement, Illumina and co-plaintiffs can request up to five audits of Oxford Nanopore's products.

Oxford Nanopore plans to release early developer kits for the method this year and is inviting customer feedback on the types of applications it should develop.

The researchers are working to improve the protocol and are in discussions with Oxford Nanopore Technologies to make it available to users. 

Interviews with leading UK scientists revealed apprehension about losing access to European funding, limitations on freedom of movement, and an exodus of biotechs to the EU.

There is significant interest in technologies that provide long-range genomic information, but only among a subset of users.

The agency is sending an Oxford Nanopore MinIon to the International Space Station to determine if the technology's microfluidic system can work in microgravity.


In Science this week: gene flow between ancient chimpanzees and bonobos, and more.

A startup wants to match customers to wine based on their DNA and one critic calls the idea 'silly,' Stat News reports.

Researchers trace the origins of brown rats using genetic analysis to China, the New York Times reports.

In Nature this week: genetic history of HIV in the US, and more.