Oxford Nanopore

Oxford Nanopore Technologies was founded in 2005 to develop an electronic, single molecule sensing system based on nanopore science. The company now has more than 250 employees from multiple disciplines including nanopore science, molecular biology and applications, informatics, engineering, electronics, manufacturing and commercialization. Oxford Nanopore's instruments — MinIon, PromethIon, and GridIon are adaptable for the analysis of DNA, RNA, proteins, small molecules and other types of molecule.

Oxford Nanopore Facts

 

CEO: Gordon Sanghera

Website: www.nanoporetech.com

Ticker symbol: Privately held

Headquarters: Oxford, UK

Number of employees: 250+

Researchers report they sequenced and identified plant species in an "al fresco" laboratory.

The Inhale project is assessing respiratory disease tests on Oxford Nanopore's MinIon and PCR platforms from Curetis and BioMérieux's BioFire Diagnostics.

MinION in the Clinic

UK clinicians are to begin a trial using Oxford Nanopore's MinION to diagnose pneumonia, according to the Telegraph.

The Smarty Pants

A number of genomics companies have made Technology Review's list of smart companies.

PlayDNA Pilot Project

The New York Genome Center spinout has been conducting a pilot project involving Oxford Nanopore's MinIon with a Manhattan middle school.

Oxford Nanopore Flongle

The company is working on a variety of updates for existing platforms, including a disposable MinIon flow cell for diagnostic applications, as well as on new nanopore devices.

Two research groups demonstrated the de novo assembly of a human genome and a tomato genome, using data from Oxford Nanopore's MinIon.

Oxford Nanopore filed two lawsuits, one in the UK and one in Germany.

In Genome Research this week: longitudinal study of Burkholderia cenocepacia isolates from cystic fibrosis patients, long-read assembly approach, and more.

PacBio alleged in its suit that Oxford Nanopore is infringing on a patent it holds related to single-molecule nanopore sequencing.  

Pages

NPR reports that Turkish high school students will no longer study evolution.

Researchers report they sequenced and identified plant species in an "al fresco" laboratory.

An Australian team searches for genetic alterations linked to depression in hopes of developing personalized treatments, the Sydney Morning Herald reports.

In PNAS this week: host contributors to typhoid fever risk, effects of obesity-related variants near TMEM18, and more.