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Sigma-Aldrich, Sangamo Expand Zinc Finger Tech License

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Sigma-Aldrich and Sangamo BioSciences today announced an expansion of their licensing deal covering zinc finger DNA binding protein-modified cell lines.

Under the new pact, Sigma-Aldrich gains exclusive rights to develop and distribute the ZFP-modified cell lines for commercial production of protein pharmaceuticals. In addition, Sigma-Aldrich has rights to certain ZFP-engineered transgenic animals for commercial applications.

"The zinc finger technology platform developed by Sangamo is a core component of Sigma-Aldrich's growth strategy into high-value biologic tools," Sigma-Aldrich Chairman, President, and CEO Jai Nagarkatti said in a statement. "Expanding our capability to provide ZFN-modified cells for the commercial production of therapeutic proteins and vaccines takes us into markets with enormous commercial potential, and we fully intend to maximize the value of these assets."

Financial terms of the agreement were not disclosed.

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