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University of North Texas Plans to use Illumina Sequencing in Forensics Projects

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The University of North Texas Health Science Center's Institute of Applied Genetics and the Department of Forensic and Investigative Genetics will use Illumina's next-generation sequencing technology in several forensics projects.

The projects will include studies on forensically relevant genetic markers for human identity testing, pharmacogenetics for molecular autopsy, microbial forensics, and additional markers and methods to generate investigative leads in criminal cases and matters of national security.

The collaboration with Illumina will enable the center "to design sample preparation, analytical protocols, hardware, and software that expand the capabilities of forensic DNA analysts," Bruce Budowle, executive director of UNT's Institute of Applied Genetics and vice chair of the Department of Forensic and Investigative Genetics, said in a statement.

"Forensic biology methods can meet the demand and improve dramatically with the application of state-of-the-art sequencing technologies," he added.

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