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U of Western Australia Gets $1M Gift for Sequencing Equipment

By a GenomeWeb staff reporter

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The University of Western Australia said it will use a nearly A$1 million (US$1 million) gift from Perth businessman Charles Morgan to buy two high-capacity genome sequencers as well as associated robotic equipment for the Lotterywest State Biomedical Facility: Genomics.

The equipment will be made available to scientists from any university or other research organization, as well as to medical and scientific staff across the Government of Western Australia's Department of Health.

The equipment will provide new capacity not available until now in Western Australia, according to the university.

The university said it will provide an additional A$225,000 for staff to support research with the new equipment. It will be housed at LSBFG, based at Royal Perth Hospital, and supported by UWA through its School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, a strategic partnership between the university and PathWest Laboratory Medicine WA.

"We aim to develop affordable, cost-effective tests for patients that will make a real difference to how we understand, diagnose and treat diseases," Richard Allcock, an associate professor who is in charge of LSBFG, said in a statement. "The tests will be useful in the diagnosis of a wide range of genetic diseases including neuromuscular disorders and cancers."

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