Two separate groups at Stanford University published improved DNA amplification methods last week that could help researchers prepare DNA from a single cell, or select thousands of DNA targets, for next-generation sequencing.
 
Both groups say that their approaches could be used in sequencing projects where scientists have to work with minute quantities of starting material, such as microorganisms that cannot be cultured, tumor biopsies, or stem cells.

Get the full story with
GenomeWeb Premium

Only $95 for the
first 90 days*

A trial upgrade to GenomeWeb Premium gives you full site access, interest-based email alerts, access to archives, and more. Never miss another important industry story.

Try GenomeWeb Premium now.

Already a GenomeWeb Premium member? Login Now.
Or, See if your institution qualifies for premium access.

*Before your trial expires, we’ll put together a custom quote with your long-term premium options.

Not ready for premium?

Register for Free Content
You can still register for access to our free content.

Researchers suggest that genetic variations could influence the side effects people experience when using synthetic cannabinoids, the International Business Times reports.

An analysis has examined the makeup of researchers on Twitter and what they share, Nature News reports.

At Stat News, Jim Kozubek argues that the Broad Institute is pushing the boundary of what a nonprofit is.

In PNAS this week: gut microbes may affect honeybee weight, phenotype and gene expression changes in DiGeorge syndrome, and more.

Apr
27
Sponsored by
SeraCare

This webinar is the third in a four-part series highlighting real-world examples of how some lab directors are bringing validated next-generation sequencing-based tests to the clinic.

May
09
Sponsored by
SeraCare

This webinar is the last in a four-part series highlighting real-world examples of how some lab directors are bringing validated next-generation sequencing-based tests to the clinic.