Two separate groups at Stanford University published improved DNA amplification methods last week that could help researchers prepare DNA from a single cell, or select thousands of DNA targets, for next-generation sequencing.
 
Both groups say that their approaches could be used in sequencing projects where scientists have to work with minute quantities of starting material, such as microorganisms that cannot be cultured, tumor biopsies, or stem cells.

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The Union of Concerned Scientists surveyed US government scientists about Trump Administration policies and more, Science reports.

National Geographic reports that marine mammals have lost a gene that could make them more susceptible to organophosphate damage.

NPR reports on Human Cell Atlas Consortium's effort to catalog all the different cell types within the human body.

In PNAS this week: history and genetic diversity of the scarlet macaw, approach for predicting human flu virus evolution, and more.

Sep
17
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SeraCare

Today’s challenging clinical next-generation sequencing applications require a rigorous, comprehensive quality control management program to ensure confidence in results.