Users of second-generation sequencing platforms from Illumina, 454/Roche, and Life Technologies/Applied Biosystems witnessed improvements in yield, read length, and data quality in 2008, though many struggled with technical problems relating to their instrument or reagents, according to a survey conducted by In Sequence at the end of 2008.

Also, the $10,000 human genome remained elusive in 2008, as the total cost for users to generate a gigabase of high-quality data ranged between $1,600 and $146,500 at the end of the year, depending on the platform.

Get the full story with
GenomeWeb Premium

Only $95 for the
first 90 days*

A trial upgrade to GenomeWeb Premium gives you full site access, interest-based email alerts, access to archives, and more. Never miss another important industry story.

Try GenomeWeb Premium now.

Already a GenomeWeb Premium member? Login Now.
Or, See if your institution qualifies for premium access.

*Before your trial expires, we’ll put together a custom quote with your long-term premium options.

Not ready for premium?

Browse our free articles
You can still register for access to our free content.

In Cell this week: biobank of colorectal cancer organoids, ancient wolf genome analysis, and more.

With cloud computing becoming more attractive to researchers, Nature News offers some tips on how to get going.

In a series of articles, medical journals debate the necessity of conflict-of-interest policies.

Irwin Rose, who won the 2004 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work on ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation, has died.

Jul
14
Sponsored by
Agilent Technologies

This online seminar will outline a recent example of the use of molecular barcoding in combination with next-generation sequencing to detect somatic mosaicism in cancer patients.