Spruce Sequences and Assemblies Offer Hints of Genome Growth | GenomeWeb

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The sequence and assembly of two spruce genomes, published in Nature and Bioinformatics yesterday, offer insight into gymnosperm biology and evolution. In particular, they offer clues as to how the expansive spruce genomes — coming in at about 20 gigabases in size — may have grown so large.

Researchers from Sweden and Canada characterized the Norway spruce and white spruce genomes — the first gymnosperms to be sequenced fully and the largest sequence assemblies produced thus far.

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