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Next-generation sequencing is helping to drive the emerging market in single-cell genomics, according to a report by Culver City, Calif.-based market research firm DeciBio.

The single-cell genomics market is expected to more than triple by 2015, with next-gen sequencing representing around $100 million of that in 2015 and growing to $300 million by 2018.

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In Genome Research this week: post-zygotic mutations in diabetes development, single-cell RNA sequencing study of aging, and more.

Dec
17
Sponsored by
Thermo Fisher Scientific

This webinar will review how liquid biopsy can be considered as an alternative and non-invasive method to tissue biopsy for cancer molecular characterization.