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Roche, Fluidigm Ink Co-promotion Pact

By a GenomeWeb staff reporter

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Roche and Fluidigm jointly announced today that the firms will co-promote Roche 454 Life Sciences' GS FLX and GS Junior sequencing systems with Fluidigm's Access Array System.

The firms said that the partnership will offer a "robust and streamlined workflow," minimizing the manual steps required for targeted sequencing applications including genotyping and rare variant detection. Financial and other terms of the alliance were not disclosed.

Christopher McLeod, president and CEO of 454 Life Sciences, said in a statement that the firms' respective technologies are "extremely complementary, allowing analysis of large numbers of sample/amplicon combinations in an affordable workflow, without the need for complicated liquid handling.

"In essence, a single Access Array plate on a single GS Junior System run generates as much data as hundreds, even thousands, of 96-well plates analyzed on a capillary sequencing system," he added.

Fluidigm's Access Array System can automate processing of 48 unique samples against 48 unique amplicons, resulting in PCR products which are ready for emPCR amplification, the partners said.

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