By Monica Heger

Adding to the debate on the importance of non-coding sequences to disease, two separate groups recently used sequencing to identify a repeat expansion in a non-coding region of chromosome 9 as the most common genetic cause of both familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontal temporal dementia.

The two groups, one led by the National Institutes of Health and the other by the Mayo Clinic Florida, published their results in a recent issue of Neuron.

Get the full story with
GenomeWeb Premium

Only $95 for the
first 90 days*

GenomeWeb Premium gives you:
✔ Full site access
✔ Interest-based email alerts
✔ Access to archives

Never miss another important industry story.

Try GenomeWeb Premium now.

Already a GenomeWeb Premium member? Login Now.
Or, See if your institution qualifies for premium access.

*Before your trial expires, we’ll put together a custom quote with your long-term premium options.

Not ready for premium?

Register for Free Content
You can still register for access to our free content.

American scientists find themselves once again warning the Trump administration not to dismiss science, the New Yorker report.

A new study suggests CRISPR could be used to save coral reefs from dying off, Forbes reports.

Researchers have found that the i-motif shape of DNA previously observed in the lab also exists in human cells, and that it may serve a purpose.

In PNAS this week: a genomic, transcriptomic, and metabolomic analysis of the tea plant, Arabidopsis thaliana's adaptations to specific local environments, and more.

Jun
12
Sponsored by
Philips Genomics

This webinar will highlight a comprehensive end-to-end solution for precision care in oncology, comprising sample acquisition through to sequencing and analysis, treatment recommendations, and follow-through.

Jun
28
Sponsored by
PerkinElmer

This webinar will review a standardized, high-throughput, and fully automated library prep protocol for human metagenomic analysis.