NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – An epistatic interaction between a rare genetic variant and common genetic variants appears to lead to a skull-fusion disorder that affects infants, according to a new study.

The human brain doubles in size in the first year after birth and continues to grow through adolescence. But in some infants — about one in 2,000 — the skull plates fuse early. Such craniosynostosis can be treated surgically, but it can cause brain compression as well as facial and skull deformities.

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The London School of Economics' Daniele Fanelli argues at the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that the reproducibility crisis in science isn't as dire as some say.

A team of researchers in Portugal has examined the genomic basis for racing pigeons' athleticism and navigational skills, finding it's likely polygenic.

Wired reports that diagnostic firms continue to seek, post-Theranos, the ability to diagnose diseases from small amounts of blood.

In Science this week: analysis of DNA from ancient North Africans, and more.

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