A team of researchers led by Craig Venter published an analysis of his genome this week — the first diploid genome of a known individual to be sequenced and published. While Venter hailed the study as an important step toward individualized genomics, he cautioned that there are still questions regarding the cost and accuracy of new sequencing methods that will need to be addressed before the field takes off.
 

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NPR reports on Human Cell Atlas Consortium's effort to catalog all the different cell types within the human body.

The Union of Concerned Scientists surveyed US government scientists about Trump Administration policies and more, Science reports.

National Geographic reports that marine mammals have lost a gene that could make them more susceptible to organophosphate damage.

In PNAS this week: history and genetic diversity of the scarlet macaw, approach for predicting human flu virus evolution, and more.

Sep
17
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Today’s challenging clinical next-generation sequencing applications require a rigorous, comprehensive quality control management program to ensure confidence in results.