Close Menu
NEW HAVEN, Conn. — Harvard Medical School’s Personal Genome Project expects to publish initial data from its first 10 participants on its website in late October, according to George Church, the project's principal investigator.
 
Data from the study, which aims to gather and correlate genomic and phenotypic information from thousands of individuals, will include DNA sequence information on 50,000 exons.
 

Get the full story with
GenomeWeb Premium

Only $95 for the
first 90 days*

GenomeWeb Premium gives you:
✔ Full site access
✔ Interest-based email alerts
✔ Access to archives

Never miss another important industry story.

Try GenomeWeb Premium now.

You may already have institutional access!

Check if I qualify.

Already a GenomeWeb or 360Dx Premium member?
Login Now.

*Before your trial expires, we’ll put together a custom quote with your long-term premium options.

Not ready for premium?

Register for Free Content
You can still register for access to our free content.

The World Health Organization will be providing low-cost COVID-19 tests to low- and middle-income nations, according to Reuters.

Nature News examines how the confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett to the US Supreme Court could affect scientific agencies.

Nobel Prize-winner Arthur Ashkin, who developed optical tweezers, has died at 98, the Washington Post reports.

In PNAS this week: altered gene expression in brain samples from Alzheimer's disease patients, effects of gene mutations found in bladder cancer, and more.

Oct
21
Sponsored by
Roche

Target enrichment has been a major driver behind the clinical adoption of next-generation sequencing (NGS) over the last decade because it simplifies analysis and provides a cost-effective method of massive parallel resequencing. It has not only replaced Sanger sequencing, but it is actively dispensing the need for parallel copy number variant (CNV) analysis using classic techniques.