Payors Prioritize Clinical Validation Studies, Guidelines in Making NIPS Coverage Decisions | GenomeWeb

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – In deciding whether or not to cover noninvasive prenatal screening tests, payors place particular emphasis on evidence from clinical validation studies and recommendations from professional societies, according to a recent study.

In a study led by Andrew Dervan from the University of Washington that included collaborators from the American Institutes for Health Research, the University of California, San Francisco, and elsewhere, researchers analyzed publicly available coverage policies from 19 large US private payors regarding NIPS.

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