OpGen and the Institute for Genome Sciences at the University of Maryland will jointly develop a database of high-quality, finished, and annotated microbial sequences, the organizations said this week.

OpGen will provide optical maps and sequence-finishing technology, while IGS will contribute clinically characterized microbial samples and sequencing data from microbial genomics studies. Data will come from the National Institutes of Health's Human Microbiome Project, the NIH-funded Genomic Sequencing Center for Infectious Diseases at IGS, and other sources.

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In PNAS this week: genomic study of group B Streptococcus evolution, selection on the X chromosome in great apes, and more.

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