Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Novogene, AITbiotech to Launch Joint Venture, New Sequencing Center

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – The sequencing service center Novogene and molecular diagnostics and services company AITbiotech will form a new joint venture called NovogeneAIT Genomics Singapore, and will establish a whole-genome sequencing center in Singapore.

The new center will provide whole-genome sequencing and bioinformatics based on Illumina's HiSeq X instruments, and will support public research projects and large-scale sequencing initiatives in Singapore and the broader region. It will also collaborate with the Genome Institute of Singapore to use whole-genome sequencing for cancer diagnosis and to identify treatments based on patients' molecular profile.

In addition, NovogeneAIT and GIS will work to develop new applications for next-generation sequencing.

"The center is the first major project for NovogeneAIT and is an important milestone for our company," Novogene CEO Ruiqian Li said in a statement.

GIS Executive Director Ng Huck Hui added, "Such public-private partnerships will prove to be highly beneficial as it leverages the strengths of both parties to advance genomic science and medicine in Singapore, as well as to create successful local biotech companies."

The Scan

Mosquitos Genetically Modified to Prevent Malaria Spread

A gene drive approach could be used to render mosquitos unable to spread malaria, researchers report in Science Advances.

Gut Microbiomes Allow Bears to Grow to Similar Sizes Despite Differing Diets

Researchers in Scientific Reports find that the makeup of brown bears' gut microbiomes allows them to reach similar sizes even when feasting on different foods.

Finding Safe Harbor in the Human Genome

In Genome Biology, researchers present a new approach to identify genomic safe harbors where transgenes can be expressed without affecting host cell function.

New Data Point to Nuanced Relationship Between Major Depression, Bipolar Disorder

Lund University researchers in JAMA Psychiatry uncover overlapping genetic liabilities for major depression and bipolar disorder.